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An introduction to information theory

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Published by Dover in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Information theory.,
  • Probabilities.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementFazlollah M. Reza.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQ360 .R43 1994
The Physical Object
Paginationxv, 496 p. :
Number of Pages496
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1102285M
ISBN 100486682102
LC Control Number94027222

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Written for an engineering audience, this book has a threefold purpose: (1) to present elements of modern probability theory—discrete, continuous, and stochastic; (2) to present elements of information theory with emphasis on its basic roots in probability theory; and (3) to present elements of coding by: INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION THEORY {ch:intro_info} This chapter introduces some of the basic concepts of information theory, as well as the definitions and notations of probabilities that will be used throughout the book. The notion of entropy, which is fundamental File Size: KB. This book is devoted to the theory of probabilistic information measures and their application to coding theorems for information sources and noisy channels. The eventual goal is a general development of Shannon’s mathematical theory of communication, but much of the space is File Size: 1MB. With that said, I think this book does still qualify as an introduction to information theory, but it really pushes the limit. Perhaps another way to say it is that this book is better fit for students in a college course, not casual readers with a passing interest in information theory/5.

The book's central concern is what philosophers call the "mind-body problem". Penrose examines what physics and mathematics can tell us about how the mind works, what they can't, and what we need to know to understand the physical processes of consciousness. An Introduction to Information Theory continues to be the most impressive. Information Theory A Tutorial Introduction James V Stone Stone Information Theory A Tutorial Introduction Sebtel Press A Tutorial Introduction Book Cover design by Stefan Brazzó riginally developed by Claude Shannon in the s, information theory laid the foundations for the digital revolution, and is now an essential. •that information is always relative to a precise question and to prior information. Introduction Welcome to this first step into the world of information theory. Clearly, in a world which develops itself in the direction of an information society, the notion and concept of information should attract a lot of scientific Size: 2MB. Originally developed by Claude Shannon in the s, information theory laid the foundations for the digital revolution, and is now an essential tool in telecommunications, genetics, linguistics, brain sciences, and deep space communication. In this richly illustrated book, accessible examples are used to introduce information theory in terms of everyday games like ‘20 questions’ before.

Introduction to Information Theory and Data Compression, Second Edition is ideally suited for an upper-level or graduate course for students in mathematics, engineering, and computer science. Features: Expanded discussion of the historical and theoretical basis of information theory that builds a firm, intuitive grasp of the subject.   How to Write an Introduction to a Book. Books often have an introduction before the first chapter of the book. This text, which is essentially a short chapter, is meant to provide information on what the book is going to be about. It gives 88%(). Written for an engineering audience, this book has a threefold purpose: (1) to present elements of modern probability theory — discrete, continuous, and stochastic; (2) to present elements of information theory with emphasis on its basic roots in probability theory; and (3) to present elements of coding theory. The emphasis throughout the book is on such basic concepts as sets, the Reviews: 1. Introduction to Information, Information Science, and Information Systems Dee McGonigle and Kathleen Mastrian 1. Reflect on the progression from data to information to knowledge. 2. Describe the term information. 3. Assess how information is acquired. 4. Explore the characteristics of quality information. 5. Describe an information system. 6.