No idle hands
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No idle hands the social history of American knitting by Anne L. Macdonald

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Published by Ballantine Books in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • Knitting -- Social aspects -- United States -- History

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementAnne L. MacDonald.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsTT819.U6 M33 1988
The Physical Object
Paginationxxvi, 484 p. :
Number of Pages484
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2749954M
ISBN 100345339061
LC Control Number86092098

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  In No Idle Hands, Macdonald considers how the necessity—and the pleasure—of knitting has shaped women’s lives. Here is the Colonial woman for whom idleness was a sin, and her Victorian counterpart, who enjoyed the pleasure of knitting while visiting with friends; the war wife eager to provide her man with warmth and comfort, and the modern woman busy creating Brand: Random House Publishing Group. No Idle Hands presents more than one hundred and fifty tramp art objects collected mainly from the United States and also including pieces from France, Germany, Switzerland, Scandinavia, Canada, Mexico, and Brazil―demonstrating the far reach this art form has had.5/5(6).   In No Idle Hands, Macdonald considers how the necessity—and the pleasure—of knitting has shaped women’s lives. Here is the Colonial woman for whom idleness was a sin, and her Victorian counterpart, who enjoyed the pleasure of knitting while visiting with friends; the war wife eager to provide her man with warmth and comfort, and the modern woman busy creating 5/5(2). About No Idle Hands “Fascinating What is remarkable about this book is that a history of knitting can function so well as a survey of the changes in women’s rolse over time.”—.

In No Idle Hands, Macdonald considers how the necessity—and the pleasure—of knitting has shaped women’s lives. Here is the Colonial woman for whom idleness was a sin, and her Victorian counterpart, who enjoyed the pleasure of knitting while visiting with friends; the war wife eager to provide her man with warmth and comfort, and the modern woman busy creating /5(43). No Idle Hands. This book is just as it says, a social history of American knitting. The pieces on the necessity of knitting during the Civil War and the World Wars are particularly insightful. Although I wish the author I done a better job of footnoting her quotes/5(2). No Idle Hands | "Fascinating What is remarkable about this book is that a history of knitting can function so well as a survey of the changes in women's rolse over time."--The New York Times Book Review An historian and lifelong knitter, Anne Macdonald expertly guides readers on a revealing tour of the history of knitting in : Ballantine. No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting by Anne L. MacDonald. Books. By. Clara Parkes. J 0 Comments. 0. First published in and recently reissued, this book shows how knitting served as a political, economic, religious, moral, and social tool from the Colonial days through westward expansion, the Civil War.

  No Idle Hands presents more than one hundred and fifty tramp art objects collected mainly from the United States and also including pieces from France, Germany, Switzerland, Scandinavia, Canada, Mexico, and Brazil—demonstrating the far Pages:   Book Overview An historian and lifelong knitter, Anne Macdonald now expertly guides readers on a revealing tour of the history of knitting in America. In No Idle Hands Macdonald considers how the necessity -- and the pleasure -- Cited by: The New York Times Book Review An historian and lifelong knitter, Anne Macdonald now expertly guides readers on a revealing tour of the history of knitting in America. In No Idle Hands, Macdonald considers how the necessity—and the pleasure—of knitting . In No Idle Hands, Macdonald considers how the necessity—and the pleasure—of knitting has shaped women’s lives. Here is the Colonial woman for whom idleness was a sin, and her Victorian counterpart, who enjoyed the pleasure of knitting while visiting with friends; the war wife eager to provide her man with warmth and comfort, and the modern woman busy creating .